Cowboy Fashionista

Much like the rule about white shoes, Cowboys around here have a rule about straw hats:  Straw hats between Memorial Day and Labor Day only.

This is Cody in his work wear the week before Memorial Day.

My understanding is that this is mostly true in Cowboy Culture, or should I say Cowboy Couture. When it comes to his hat, my cowboy is fashion conscious, even if it means toughing out a few hot days in late May until Memorial Day arrives.

This is Cody in his work wear on Memorial Day.

Now, when I met him in 1995, he was mixing and matching black shoes and a brown belt… it was nearly a deal breaker for my fashion taste.  But, I was able to overlook the belt and shoe problem since this view was so much better.

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Tiny calf

Last week, I introduced you to Andre the Giant, the biggest calf on the ranch.  This week, meet Tiny, the smallest calf on the ranch.

Tiny is so cute and super sweet.  Luckily, she has a momma who loves her (and a cowboy, too, by the looks of it!). But, momma is a first calf heifer who doesn’t seem to be producing quite enough milk, even for this little one.  In that case, we are keeping her close by to supplement feedings.

She is happy for the extra meals.  Although, she’d rather have the real deal from her momma.  Who can blame her?  Mother’s milk is called “liquid gold” for a reason.

Andre the Giant

Meet Andre the Giant!  He was born on Tuesday night to Cow #5187 and weighs over 100 lbs.

His momma ran away for a day after giving birth so we loaded him up and took him home for a bottle.

Momma was located and they are now back together.  Both are adjusting well.

Sheesh, I’m pretty sure I would’ve run away for a while after trying to give birth to a baby this big, too!

More time for more work

In the age of technology, ranching has become more efficient.  There are still things that are done the traditional way but with cell phones, trucks and trailers things can be done a bit faster and with more communication.

This week, the guys moved a set of yearlings about 13 mountainous miles to their summer pasture.  They drove them horseback, begining at first light.  This photo is not from this particular drive but the beauty of the early morning was quite like this:

 Fifty years ago, the guys would’ve driven the yearlings, then they would’ve made the ride back home.  They probably would’ve packed a sandwich and hopefully would’ve made it home by late-afternoon, assuming everything went as planned.

These days, we can meet the guys with a truck and trailer at the end point.  They are home in time for lunch, the horses are spared the trip home on foot and one more project (or two or five or more) can be completed before dark.